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Excited to begin my journey, hopefully I can end up with some hardware?
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October 8, 2021 - 9:46 pm
Member Since: October 8, 2021
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I've been taking electronics courses, some in DIY audio synthesis and even some for video synthesis, and I'm very excited to finally be seeing the path through the forest. I'm picking up the Pirkle books, Stieglitz's DSP Primer, and Steven Smith's Scientists and Engineer's Guide to DSP. I'm hoping eventually to use something like the Blackfin platform to make my own hardware synths for both audio and video, and explore the limits of implementing this sort of thing on Arduino's/AVR chips. I realize it's another series of steps tacked on but so far this seems the natural progression to me of what to do and how to do it. I'm hoping there's someone here to talk about that sort of thing, or heck maybe even that there's a book out there that would teach me exactly what I want to know. I have some experience with Arduino programming and can read pseudocode, but I'm an amateur as far as programming goes, even though I've flipped through books on software design patterns and things like DSP code and algorithm writeups before and not been completely lost at times. 

A year from now I hope to have some prototypes people very much would consider using as an addition to their studio.

Any suggestions, book recommendations, courses I could take online would be appreciated. 

I wasn't sure where I could post this but I figured this would be the best place for other beginners and discussions about it, since it feels slightly off topic.

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October 11, 2021 - 2:20 pm
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Well, plugins today are a combination of C++ and DSP theory so those are the two topics to study. 

A fundamental issue that I constantly fight is that there is a mis-conception that learning a plugin framework (JUCE, iPlug2, or ASPiK) is the equivalent of plugin software developer training.

It isn't, and the most common problem I see in resumes and applications is from "JUCE Programmers" who don't know anything about the underlying DSP theory, who hate the underlying math and don't want to get near it, and/or have no experience in converting AES or IEEE paper algorithms into code.

If you limit yourself to just learning a framework, then there are certainly jobs out there but eventually you have to overcome the DSP theory and math. And, two of the most important C++ topics are data structures and design patterns. 

So I try to get my students to focus on the DSP, abstract math, and algorithm development first, then worry about frameworks after that especially since I only have one semester (~14 weeks) to get the students from zero to hero on real-time audio processing. And I tell them that if they can learn ASPiK, navigate its documentation, and get used to 3rd party frameworks or RackAFX, then they can easily pick up JUCE or iPlug2, or in the case of several very well-known plugin manufacturers, learn and understand their company-specific (and secret) plugin frameworks and development platforms when they get their first jobs or internships. 

Also, FWIW, when I started teaching audio signal processing at the University of Miami in 1996, I taught Analog Devices ADSP2100 assembly language. The following two years, I switched to Motorola DSP 56K assembly language. We designed algorithms and loaded them into DSP ICs via the 9-pin serial interface (mouse connector). When VST2 came out, the writing was on the wall so I switched to that (around 1999). Ultimately, it's all the same stuff whether assembly or C++ as far as I'm concerned. 

So, that is my $0.02 though I am sure others will disagree with me. That is one of the reasons I have retired from teaching. 

Will 

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October 14, 2021 - 11:12 am
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W Pirkle said
Well, plugins today are a combination of C++ and DSP theory so those are the two topics to study. 

A fundamental issue that I constantly fight is that there is a mis-conception that learning a plugin framework (JUCE, iPlug2, or ASPiK) is the equivalent of plugin software developer training.

It isn't, and the most common problem I see in resumes and applications is from "JUCE Programmers" who don't know anything about the underlying DSP theory, who hate the underlying math and don't want to get near it, and/or have no experience in converting AES or IEEE paper algorithms into code.

If you limit yourself to just learning a framework, then there are certainly jobs out there but eventually you have to overcome the DSP theory and math. And, two of the most important C++ topics are data structures and design patterns. 

So I try to get my students to focus on the DSP, abstract math, and algorithm development first, then worry about frameworks after that especially since I only have one semester (~14 weeks) to get the students from zero to hero on real-time audio processing. And I tell them that if they can learn ASPiK, navigate its documentation, and get used to 3rd party frameworks or RackAFX, then they can easily pick up JUCE or iPlug2, or in the case of several very well-known plugin manufacturers, learn and understand their company-specific (and secret) plugin frameworks and development platforms when they get their first jobs or internships. 

Also, FWIW, when I started teaching audio signal processing at the University of Miami in 1996, I taught Analog Devices ADSP2100 assembly language. The following two years, I switched to Motorola DSP 56K assembly language. We designed algorithms and loaded them into DSP ICs via the 9-pin serial interface (mouse connector). When VST2 came out, the writing was on the wall so I switched to that (around 1999). Ultimately, it's all the same stuff whether assembly or C++ as far as I'm concerned. 

So, that is my $0.02 though I am sure others will disagree with me. That is one of the reasons I have retired from teaching. 

Will   

Will,

Honestly I prefer to use ASPIK & RackAFX than Juce... You have done a great job and I really love what you have done! 

Best Regards,

Jean

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