Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
The One-Sample Delay
No permission to create posts
July 7, 2016
12:51 pm
Avatar
clau_ste
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 39
Member Since:
April 5, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I'm arrived at page 58, where the books talks about "Design a High-Frequency Tone Control Plug-In" and it confused me in this question : the one sample delay is an algorithm like multiplier, substraction etc etc or it's the delay effect used in plug-ins?

July 8, 2016
6:25 pm
Avatar
Tom
Admin
Forum Posts: 65
Member Since:
April 3, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

If you delay a digital signal by one sample and mix it with the original signal, the "mix" control will behave like a "tone control". Just continue reading - the book takes you from there to filters, EQs and later you will also see that "delay" effect Wink.

July 12, 2016
8:33 pm
Avatar
clau_ste
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 39
Member Since:
April 5, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Ok, but this is just the delay effect or it's something different? I don't understand

July 13, 2016
1:30 am
Avatar
W Pirkle
Admin
Forum Posts: 143
Member Since:
January 28, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

If you want to think of it as a "delay effect" to start, then yes, it is a "delay effect" of one sample (rather than a delay of some number of seconds).

However, "true" delay effects are based on circular buffers (see the Delay Effect chapter), which is not the case with the tone control example. What Tom is trying to point out is that when the delays are short (a few samples), mixing them back with the dry signal produces tonal effects, rather than echoes, to our ears. We hear it as an EQ type of operation.

When the delays are long and mixed back with the dry signal, we tend to hear them as discrete echoes, although there is also filtering taking place as well (inverse comb filtering, as covered in the Delay Effect chapter).

The concept of being able to define the digital delay of n-samples of a signal as a mathematical operation (multiplication by e^jwn, as detailed in the DSP Theory Chapter) is part of the special beauty of DSP theory.

- Will

July 19, 2016
12:34 pm
Avatar
clau_ste
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 39
Member Since:
April 5, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Perfect, now i've a clear idea of what's going on 🙂

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 36

Currently Online:
2 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Skyler: 47

Peter: 41

Derek: 41

clau_ste: 39

Frodson: 38

Gwen: 32

EZB: 24

lppier: 23

Msaldaña: 18

Jorge: 17

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 476

Moderators: 1

Admins: 4

Forum Stats:

Groups: 11

Forums: 30

Topics: 482

Posts: 1876

Newest Members:

sam, annaharris, Marie Weaver, kev, Steven, Mr Anderson, mguy, omelc

Moderators: W Pirkle: 143

Administrators: Tom: 65, JD Young: 80, Will Pirkle: 0, W Pirkle: 143